4.8 The Bay of Fundy and the tides of climate change

2 Vulnerability to climate change – the case of Charlotte County

2.1 Context

« We are headed for difficult times »

   -  former Saint Andrews mayor Stan Choptiany (CBC, Sept. 7, 2016)

In recent years, the southwestern region of New Brunswick has experienced multiple and significant hydro-meteorological hazards including floods, blizzards, and ice storms, causing significant damage to infrastructure and services and affecting people, municipalities as well as environmental assets (Signer et al., 2014). In Saint Andrews, a particularly significant storm occurred on November 5, 2010, when a large low-pressure system brought high winds accompanied by an extreme high tide and 45 mm of rain (figure 11). On December 12, 2010, another low pressure system brought 166.4 mm of rain to Saint Stephen airport and flooding to many places in Charlotte county (figure 12). The summer of 2013 brought more heavy precipitations, with 240 mm measured in Saint Stephen over the week from July 21-28, including 163 mm in a single day, resulting in businesses and homes being flooded, the railway line washed away for the second time in three years. In December 2013 and January 2014, a series of intense storm events comprised of freezing rain, ice pellets, extreme wind chill temperatures, and snow storms impacted Charlotte County, causing impassable road conditions, businesses closures, violent wind gusts, fallen trees, etc. Over 13,300 residences experienced power losses, lasting up to twelve days. As a result of those recent developments, two local environmental non- governmental organizations, the St Croix Estuary Project Inc (SCEP) and the Eastern Charlotte Waterways Inc (ECW) undertook to produce a Charlotte County Community Vulnerability Assessment (CCCVA), which was published in 2014 in order to gather and share knowledge and concerns relative to climate change and climate risks (Signer et al., 2014). The ultimate goal was to reduce the communities’ vulnerability to the current and future impacts of climate change.

 

  • Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.
    Figure 11. Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.

    Photos : Schauffler, November 5, 2010

  • Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.
    Figure 11. Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.

    Photos : Stan Choptiany, April 7, 2015

  • Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.
    Figure 11. Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.

    Photos : Stan Choptiany, April 7, 2015

  • Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.
    Figure 11. Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.

    Photos : Pat Mann, April 7, 2015

  • Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.
    Figure 11. Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.

    Photos : Stan Choptiany, April 7, 2015

  • Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.
    Figure 11. Images of floods in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.

    Photos : Pat Mann, April 7, 2015

St. George power dam, on the left Dec. 15, 2010, on the right in calm weather.

Figure 12. St. George power dam, on the left Dec. 15, 2010, on the right in calm weather.

Source: left St. Croix Courier, right Alex Vye, October 2003S, in Wikipedia